FLOOD MAPPING

Building Resilience in Our Communities

Welcome Educators!

During the 2018-19 school year 116 local classes participated in the Flood Mapping — Building Resilience in Our Communities project. For the 2019-20 school year, we encourage classes throughout the Hampton Roads region to join other citizen scientists in mapping nuisance flooding events. Please see the FAQ for more information.

How to Participate

WHRO encourages local classes, to participate in the Flood Mapping – Building Resilience in Our Communities project — an initiative to map flooding on school campuses and neighborhoods-during the 2019-20 school year.

Eligibility

The project is open to any class in Hampton Roads.

Requirements

Each student must conduct quarterly measurements, submit a final presentation on a recommended or related topic, and submit a signed pledge to do their part to create a community that is resilient to the effects of flooding.

Requirements are outlined more fully in the FAQ.

Training Videos

For Users

How to Download and Register
Learn how

How to Join a Region
Learn how

How to Add a Trouble Spot on an Android Device
Learn how

How to Add a Trouble Spot on an iOS Device
Learn how

For Teachers

How to Create a Region
Learn how

How to Export Data
Learn how

How to Create a Mapping Event
Learn how

Frequently Asked Questions

What type of devices do we need to participate in this project?

All students need some type of smart device with a data plan (not just a Wi-Fi enabled device) to perform the quarterly measurements described below.

If my class(es) is/are selected to receive a stipend, what's the next step?

Upon enrollment, teachers will be contacted by WHRO with additional information, including detailed instructions on how to use the Sea Level Rise app, a sample Student Pledge, training options, and how to submit the requested student items noted below.

What are the requirements of participation?

  1. Quarterly Measurements using the "Trouble Spots" feature in the free Sea Level Rise app. (Please note that students and teachers who wish to participate must have access to a smart phone/tablet with an active data plan. Wi-Fi devices will not work with the Sea Level Rise app.)
  2. A presentation on one of the following topics (or a related topic of their choosing):
    1. How Earth systems interactions produce weather
    2. Potential effects of climate change on Sea Level Rise
    3. Potential/existing impacts of high-water / flooding events on ecosystems
    4. Potential/existing impacts of high-water / flooding events on infrastructure and the economy, or
    5. Potential/existing impacts of the high-water / flooding events on flora and fauna
  3. Signed pledges to do their part to create a community that is resilient to the effects of flooding

How do my students submit the required items?

The Quarterly Measurements are automatically submitted through the Trouble Spots feature of the Sea Level Rise app. (Please note that students and teachers who wish to participate must have access to a smart phone/tablet with an active data plan. Wi-Fi devices will not work with the Sea Level Rise app.) Detailed instructions on how to use the app will be made available to all participating classes and training options will also be made available.

The Student Presentations and the Signed Student Pledges can be delivered in a variety of ways including via e-mail, FTP, etc. Please note that the Student Presentations can take many forms, including but not limited to a PowerPoint, a White Paper, a Video, etc. This will all be covered once your class(es) has/have been officially selected and training options will also be made available.

Are there any training sessions planned?

Yes. Dates, times and locations can be found on our calendar.

Where can I get more information?

For more information, please e-mail floodmapping@whro.org.

What's Catch the King and how is it connected to the Flood Mapping — Building Resilience in Our Communities project?

Catch the King was a citizen science GPS data collection effort centered in Hampton Roads during the fall of 2017 and 2018 that sought to map the year's highest astronomical tide, known as the "King Tide." Using the Sea Level Rise app, volunteers in a dozen Hampton Roads cities and counties participated in the event. The goal of the effort was to validate and improve predictive models for future forecasting of increasingly pervasive "nuisance" flooding. Partners included the Daily Press, The Virginian-Pilot, WHRO Public Media, WVEC-TV, Wetlands Watch, and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Given the popularity of the 2017 event, Catch the King will now be an annual activity.

Classes that are enrolled to participate in the Flood Mapping — Building Resilience in Our Communities project this year are strongly encouraged to participate in the 2019 Catch the King event but it is not mandatory.

What is the Sea Level Rise app and where can I get it?

The Sea Level Rise app was developed by Concursive Corporation, a privately held open source software development and solutions company headquartered in Norfolk in partnership with Wetlands Watch of Norfolk and is available free-of-charge on iTunes and Google Play.

Flood Mapping — Building Resilience in Our Communities is made possible in part with funding from the Hampton Roads Community Foundation and the Batten Environmental Education Initiative.

Lesson Plans

Mapping the Potential Impacts of Sea Level Rise

Explore the astronomical high tide, or "King Tide," forecasted for the morning of October 27, 2019, which will serve as a baseline to demonstrate what scientists believe will constitute low tide in approximately fifty years.

Guide students as they capture non-tidal flood data and map points. Then, report findings to help enhance the accuracy of tidal inundation models.

This content was made possible through the Batten Environmental Education Initiative - dedicated to educating the Virginia's environmental stewards of tomorrow.

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